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Drill Categories

By: Jonathan Pederson

    Is your son or daughter interested in doing drill?  Does he or she know what kind of drill they want to do?  Do you know what that even means?  If not, we can help you understand!  There are eight main events of drill, and provided examples of each from our own teams to help illustrate them.

R-MA students doing drill

1. Inspection Team ~ A flight of cadets and a commander typically in three elements. The team is judged on how they march into the room, displaying simple drill movements and an open rank inspection. During this open ranks inspection the judges ask various JROTC and USAF basic knowledge questions. In addition to the questions cadets are graded on a uniform inspection.

 

2. Color Guard ~ A team of four individuals (Commander, USAF Flag, Right Guard and Left Guard) perform a specific drill sequence designated ahead of time performing basic color guard movements such as wheel turns, colors reverse, slinging / unslinging rifles, casing and uncasing the flags as well as presenting the colors. The Team is judged based upon the Commander’s military bearing, the drill sequence, grooming, sharpness of movements and overall appearance.

 

3. Armed Exhibition ~ A team of at least six individuals and a Commander performing a drill sequence using rifles with the Commander having the option of carrying a saber. The exhibition team can vary their uniforms making them distinct and displaying team pride. The routine is judged based upon military bearing, flow, level of difficulty, overall impression, uniform grooming, and uniqueness. There is also a specified time limit in which the sequence must be conducted.

 

4. Unarmed Exhibition ~ A team of at least six individuals and a Commander performing a drill sequence without rifles led by a Commander. Areas of judgement include the Commander’s bearing and leadership, unit proficiency and cohesion and precision, military bearing, level of difficulty, flow, overall impression, and the routine uniqueness.  There is also a specified time limit in which the drill must be conducted.

 

5. Armed Regulation ~ A team of at least nine cadets and a Commander performing a specific drill sequence with roughly 40-plus maneuvers carrying rifles. One of the sequences maneuvers conducted is a drill movement called the “16 Count Manual of Arms.” The team is judged based upon performing the movements, uniform and grooming, unit togetherness, and Commander’s voice and bearing.

 

6. Unarmed Regulation ~A team of at least nine cadets and Commander performing a specific drill sequence with roughly 40-plus maneuvers without rifles. The team is judged based upon the Commander’s military bearing and leadership, unit cohesion, uniform and grooming standards, and overall appearance.

 

7. 1st Year Unarmed Regulation ~ A team of at least nine cadets serving their first year in the JROTC program and Commander performing a specific drill sequence with roughly 40-plus maneuvers without rifles. The team is judged based upon the Commander’s military bearing and leadership, unit cohesion, uniform and grooming standards, and overall appearance.

 

8. 1st Year Color Guard ~A team of four individuals (Commander, USAF Flag, Right Guard and Left Guard) serving in their first year in the JROTC program performing a specific drill sequence designated ahead of time, performing basic color guard movements such as wheel turns, colors reverse, and presenting the colors. The Team is judged based upon the Commander’s military bearing, the drill sequence, grooming, sharpness of movements and overall appearance.

 
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